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Benefits of Cycling

Cycling:

  • Improves general health, helps to lower both blood pressure and the resting heart rate
  • Helps with weight and stress management
  • Improves fitness
  • Cyclists and pedestrians breathe in less fumes than car drivers
  • Saves you money
  • Produces no pollution so is good for the environment
  • Often quicker to get around in congested areas
  • Fewer cars on the road mean safer roads

Cycling Tips

For excellent beginner advise on cycling, visit CyclingUK to get the most out of riding a bike, whatever your ability. Cycling UK has been sharing advice about cycling for over 140 years.

British Cycling

British Cycling UK have some great tips for getting started, whether you want to get fit, race or just get around under your own steam, British Cycling have a range of ways to help you get into cycling.

Cycling Myths Uncovered

Cycleschemes Myth buster: read about the myths surrounding cycling among non-cyclists.

Sustrans - Tackling Physical Activity

Sustrans improving physical activity by enabling people to walk and bike for many more local and everyday journeys.

Cycling and Walking Webinar Presentation

The majority of journeys include at least some element of walking or cycling, either as the main mode of transport for short journeys, or as a connecting part of a longer journey. Read Public Health's Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy webinar presentation.

Active Travel Report

There are marked differences (statistically significant) between different groups in the extent to which they are reliant on walking for travel to achieve recommended levels of activity:

  • Socio-economic status – 8% of NS SEC 1-2 (higher income groups) who achieve threshold levels of physical activity are dependent on walking to achieve sufficient physical activity, compared with 10% of NS SEC 3-5 (middle income groups) and 16% of NS SEC 6-8 (lower income groups)
  • Gender – 12% of females who achieve threshold levels of physical activity are dependent on walking to achieve these levels, compared with 9% of males
  • Health impairment – 16% of disabled people who achieve threshold levels of physical activity are dependent on walking to achieve these levels, compared with 10% of people with no disability
  • Older people – 17% of those aged over 85 years and who achieve threshold levels of physical activity are dependent on walking to achieve these levels, compared with other age groups (other age groups range from 7% to 13%)

Ethnic groups – people from South Asian, Black and Other ethnic groups who achieve threshold levels of physical activity are more dependent on walking to achieve these levels relative to other ethnic groups.

Read Sport England's full report below.